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Monday, March 16, 2020

Design Wall Monday - March 16, 2020

Well, the world is in crisis mode right now.  There are lots of unknowns here in Michigan, and lots of closings.  The Governor just closed all the K-12 schools and all events where people gather are being cancelled.

The only good thing I can think of during this upheaval is that my quilting hobby is unchanged.  It's a rock in a very unstable time.  I imagine you think so too.    Our sewing give us a sense of calm, even when all around us adjustments and changes are being made daily.

We had tickets to go to the Big 10 basketball tournament, but on Monday afternoon, we got a refund, and also a refund on our hotel confirmation.  It was a good decision, as on Thursday, they cancelled the whole thing.  We are staying home, and I am working on embroidery on the baskets of flowers.  The latest one:


I looked on EBay and bought the  November 1932 issue of "Successful Farming", just to see the advertisement where they offered the quilt pattern for the 30 baskets.  The whole magazine is so interesting to read.  What the farmers and their wives were interested in when my Mother was a teenager is good reading for me.



Here is the magazine description:

Interesting embroidery work that you will enjoy doing.  Consider 32 baskets, each one different in design, each one filled with gay blossoms, all embroidered upon a single quilt.  If you would keep the beauties of Springtime ever with you, do make a flower basket quilt.  The Flower Baskets can be stamped on muslin, unbleached muslin, sateen or broad-cloth.  There are 32 blocks, 9x9 inches, two more than are needed for the quilt.  The extra blocks may be used for pillows or bolster.  Complete set of 32 blocks stamped on 8 sheets, only 50 cents.  Patchwork pattern for Petal Border and 9-inch quilting design, 10 cents.

Also, I was looking online to see if I could see a completed quilt made with this pattern, and I found that in 2018 one was a third place winner in  Paducah, Kentucky (for the category of first entry in a Paducah contest).  If you'd like to see the video, click on this link: (Here)  The winner, Linda D. Vaughan, said the pattern was called "Meredith's Inheritance" and the pattern "maker" copied it from an old quilt.   Linda commented that the pattern was all French knots and lazy-daisy stitches, which she found boring.  Linda filled her quilt with lots of different embroidery stitches......and her long-arm quilter did a spectacular job with the quilting.  Both her embroidery and the amazing quilting were fun for me to see.

I shall send my long-arm quilter the video and she will probably faint if I suggest she follow the prize winner's quilting pattern.  LOL I'm not going to think about the quilting until I get the top finished.

What are you doing this week, besides washing your hands and not touching your face?  Stay healthy and please send a picture to the link up and show us what sewing is happening at your home.  All I ask is that you link back to this particular blog post from somewhere within your blog post.  Thanks!

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16 comments:

  1. What a great magazine! I think it's interesting to see how much things cost back then. I bet 50 cents was a lot of money during the depression.

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  2. The basket is a beauty, so pretty! Stay healthy!

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  3. Very pretty basket. And a fun history lesson. It is nice to have the sewing room escape with so much turmoil everywhere and the blog community helps too. Take care!

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  4. your basket looks lovely. Good to have canceled the plans for being in a crowd. I'm wondering how much more time I have here before we will be isolating too. I had no big plans made - I had thought to possible drive over to Paducah next month for the show but I have a feeling that might be cancelled - or maybe it is far enough out yet that it will be ok - we will see

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  5. I can't even imagine all those French Knots!!! I am going out later to get some sewing supplies and maybe lunch out to support our small resatuarant owners.

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  6. for my father-in-laws 90th birthday I hunted down 3 magazines published that month in 1918. What fun resources we have. Stay well friend, none of our hospitals have enough respirators for this kind of illness, they will be faced with terrible choices.

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  7. Very interesting to see what has survived so many years in paper form--wish the quilt illustration was a bit larger. I have a large group of magazines from the late 40s-50s that my MIL saved, The Workbasket, I think its called. Also has many mail away patterns and all kinds of tatting, crochet, and "lunch set" embroidery work. California is shut down and a lot of craziness at the stores. As the most populous state, there are so many millions affected!

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  8. That was a fun video... very cool to see the blocks up close!
    How interesting to be able to read that old magazine!
    Enjoy your slow stitching!

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  9. That's so cool that you were able to find the pattern source for your basket quilt as well as a recent example. I think we're all going to find ourselves spending more time at home on our stitching these days.

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  10. March Madness continued in St Louis, without fans. Another great block, the quilt is going to be wonderful.

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  11. Thank goodness quilting will keep us sane!

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  12. I love these old magazines as well. SO much of interest in them. I watched the video...such a modest woman with her very beautiful quilt. The quilting itself is extraordinary but her embroidery is lovely. Your basket here is gorgeous. Are there colour suggestions as to which to use?

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  13. Our Summit League college basketball tournament finished up last week Tuesday - the same day the first 5 cases of Covid-19 were found in South Dakota. We had a great time at the tournament, and hopefully there won't be a bunch of cases coming from that crowd of people.

    My husband and I already both work from home so that aspect of life isn't too different yet. That may change if we end up with elementary school age grandchildren to care for. My daughters both work in health care and their hospitals are already understaffed. And obviously respiratory therapists won't do their patients any good working from home. The other daughter is an occupational therapist at a VA hospital. Again - no option to work from home. But we'll all survive.

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  14. How fun to read the original ad for your baskets. And to find a finished quilt to look at. Good sleuthing skills on your part. With less than 4 days staying home all the time, except a walk in the neighborhood with chatting to neighbors at a distance, I suspect after a week or two I will be stir crazy. Is it terrible that I really want to go to my hairdresser on Wed? I need a haircut!

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  15. Ooh, that bothers me. If a quilt pattern is old enough to be in the public domain and there is no widely available pattern for making it, I don’t have a problem with someone issuing a new pattern —particularly if they are providing detailed instructions or modernized methods for making the quilt using tools or techniques that weren’t available back then. But I feel like there is a burden on the person profiting from that old design to ascertain who the original designer was and give them credit. However, copyright on artwork doesn’t expire until 95 years after the copyright owner’s DEATH — and this pattern was published in 1932. Even if the pattern designer dropped dead at the moment of publication, his/her heirs still own the copyright on this quilt pattern until the year 2027. Which makes “Meredith’s Inheritance” an intellectual property theft or piracy.

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  16. Stay safe in this turbulent time!

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