Monday, August 19, 2019

Design Wall Monday - August 19, 2019

Hello Quilters!  I have had a great "catch-up" week, with no company.  All the sheets are washed, hung out on the clothesline for that fresh air smell, and all the towels are now clean and folded and put away.  I am also refreshed, and ready for more company next week.  We love to have friends visit.

And the copy of the vintage quilt that I am getting ready for the quilt show in Newport News, VA next spring, is now a top.  I shared a picture of it with you last week.  Someone asked last week how to get a nice straight look with the sashing, as it is lined up without cornerstones.  There is a YouTube video about this (Here) 


I found with this quilt that I had to measure the sashing carefully to keep it a consistent width since the sashing was three fabrics sewn together.  If the blocks are a consistent size and the sashing a consistent size, the math works.  

After finishing the large quilt, I knew I wanted to make a doll quilt just like it.  I am often asked how I figure out a smaller version of a larger block.  This is what I did with this block:

The block consists of four flying geese, two half-square triangles, and some filler pieces.....and four outside rectangles to put it on point.  Here is a picture of four of the small blocks I have made:






The large quilt has blocks that finish at 9 inches square, with sashing that finishes at 4.5 inches.  So I aimed for a doll quilt block that finishes at about half that size.  There are four flying geese units in the middle, and I decided I didn't want to go any smaller than a finished size of 1.5 inches by .75 inches for the 4 geese.   (Geese are always half as tall as they are wide)  So I cut rectangles at 2 inches by 1.25 inches (adding half inch total of seam allowance).  After those were made, I guessed at making the half square triangles to finish at 1 inch square.  I added background triangles to fill in the blank spaces, guessing at the size needed, and ended with a "middle" of the block that finished at 3 inches square.  With the outer red triangles added, the block finishes at 4.25 inches.  An odd size, but not important for a doll quilt.

If you want to try to make some small geese to make this block, I will give sized for the rest of the block pieces next week.  For the geese, cut four pieces 2 inches by 1.25 inches and eight "sky" pieces 1.25 inches square.  Add the corners to the "geese" and cut away the extra fabric from the back behind the sky.  And NO, I didn't save these little tiny triangles - they were way too small to make something with!

Hubby bought me gladiolus two times this summer.  A farmhouse family has them for sale out by the road on his way home from the golf course.  Lucky me!  Here is the second bouquet:



Michigan weather has been so perfect this summer for the flowers  And crops too.  Sweet corn and blueberries are in season right now.  I picked giant blueberries last week, and am enjoying them for breakfast now.  Yumm!!

I hope to have the doll quilt finished to show you next week.  What's on your design wall?  Please linkup and show us what you are making.  As always, please link to this particular post somewhere within your blog post.  Thanks!



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9 comments:

  1. It's so nice when Your Guy brings you flowers for no reason isn't it. Mine does that often. Gorgeous glads! Enjoy your relaxing week with some good stitching time.

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  2. I cant wait to see the full size version.

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  3. Love those little geese--will give them a try...hugs, Julierose

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  4. lovely quilt blocks, love glads! I always find it so amazing when you all in the north are picking blueberries in August - here it is early June

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  5. Pretty gladiolus! My mom used to have these in the yard many years ago. Your tiny blocks are so cute.

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  6. Those tiny blocks are beautiful. You have lots of patience.

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  7. Beautiful blocks as always. Colours really striking too. Love the August gladiolos.

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  8. Ooh, sweet corn from the upper Midwest is the BEST! I don't even buy corn anymore; the stuff they grow in the Carolinas is such a huge disappointment, I think it's only fit for livestock to consume! Flying geese units 1.5" x .75"?! That is mind-boggling! I am amazed at your tiny piecing!

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